For the Record…We own guns.

Sometimes, in the blogging world I feel really out of place when it comes to the other bloggers I associate/interact with.

Actually? A lot like this…

Especially? When it comes to…GUNS.

My opinion on guns is not of the “popular one” particularly among the “mom-blog” community.

I really don’t get worked up over many things. I’m pretty laid back. I realize that everyone has their own opinion on different matters and that a lot of the time, they’re not the same as mine and that’s ok. Normally, I just keep my mouth shut, but I read a post the other day, and some of the comments that accompanied it and my blood started to boil.

It was all I could do not to start typing up a frenzy in the comments. To me, the post touched on two very different aspects of guns but wrapped them up into the same category. One being people that have guns that shouldn’t for reasons such as mental issues, criminal past, etc. The other aspect focused on kids and guns and how kids are killing other kids with guns and how many millions of homes in the US there are with kids and loaded, unlocked guns. There was also the generalization that all guns and all people that have guns are bad.

First of all, I completely agree with the post in regard to the fact that there should be a better screening process for someone purchasing a fire arm. Plain & Simple some people should not be able to purchase, or have access to, a firearm. About a year ago a local police officer lost his life in a “routine” traffic stop because the woman he pulled over had a mental illness and fatally shot him as he approached her vehicle. Would he still be here today if the state of Oregon had different screening processes/laws in place? Probably. Should there be some sort of formal gun handling/shooting training required in order to purchase a gun? Perhaps.

And what about that little girl that was recently shot accidentally by a classmate because the kid brought a gun to school? Thank God that little girl is alive and recovering. Is it the guns fault for shooting that girl? Hardly. Is it the little boy’s fault? I would go with a no on that one. When it comes down to it, his parents need to be held accountable for what happened. Whether or not they should own a gun, they do and it was their negligence that harmed that girl…negligence for leaving a loaded gun somewhere a young child could get it and negligence for not teaching that boy about proper gun safety. Again, I agree with the author of the post that there are better ways that we can protect children when it comes to firearms.

So, I agree there are people that should absolutely not have guns, have access to guns, etc. And there are opportunities for better gun laws that would protect children. But, when it comes down to it? Not every.single.person. that owns a gun is irresponsible and unfit to do so.

Guess what? I have a gun. Multiple guns, in fact. Some to be used specifically for hunting {another unpopular topic among the vast majority of mom-blogs}, a few that are just fun to shoot and yes, even one for {GASP!} home defense.

In absolutely no instance are there guns just laying around loaded! In no instance does my daughter have any access to any firearm in our house. All of our guns are locked up in a gun safe. Most, in addition to being locked up, also have trigger locks on them. And all of our ammo (aside from our hand gun) is locked in a separate cabinet. And even though our hand gun is loaded, it’s locked away in it’s own safe. To be honest, to me, it doesn’t matter that one is loaded and the rest are not, because the number one rule of gun safety is that you treat every single firearm as though it’s loaded.

And when the gun(s) do come out? We take every single opportunity to teach our daughter about gun safety. Yes, even at 3 years old. She knows she’s never to touch a gun. If she sees one, she needs to immediately find a trusted adult. When we hold guns,  it needs to be held in a safe direction, away from people. If we’re in the house, or if we’re taking the guns in a vehicle, the first thing we do is make sure it’s not loaded. We never point them anywhere but where we are planning on shooting. We never put our finger on the trigger until we are ready to shoot.

Does this make me a bad person? Would you not let your kid come over to my house and play just because of the simple fact that I have guns in my house?

To be honest, if you told me that you wouldn’t let your kid come over because we own guns, I’d probably be offended. I certainly wouldn’t be offended that you asked, because it’s your job as a parent to keep your child safe, and as Rylee gets older and goes on playdates at other people’s houses, it’s something I’ll certainly be asking. I’d take offense to the fact that if you asked, and I took the time to tell you, heck even show you, that we take precautions when it comes to firearms that you would still make the assumption that your child would not be safe in my home. If anything, knowing that you, and your child, are uneasy when it comes to guns, I’d go above and beyond to make sure everything was locked away, and stayed that way, as it should be as long as your child was in my home and in my care.

For me, it’s not the guns that scare me. It’s the people that have access to them that shouldn’t. It’s the people that don’t respect them. It’s the people that don’t know how to use them properly. It’s the people that don’t teach their little ones about said respect and proper use.

So, there you have it…my unpopular opinion on guns. We might not see eye to eye on the subject, but just like Sandra Bullock says at the end of Miss Congeniality, “…I really do want world peace.”

End rant.

23 thoughts on “For the Record…We own guns.

  1. Brandy

    As a girl raised in a hunting household, I was also taught a healthy respect for guns. There were guns in my house. I knew it but I NEVER went near them. Looking back i liked it this way. If there ever came a time that I would need to use that for some horrible reason, I knew what to do. I was taught how to shoot with a BB gun at maybe a middle school age. At that time we also learned I am right handed and left eye dominant (not the norm). This is important in the case I ever NEEDED to use one. If I tried to shoot the "normal" way, I would miss…terribly. This was a lesson I needed to learn and how else would have I learned?

    It is always cliche but guns don't kill people. People do. Along with that, treating guns as crazy forbidden objects is only going to spike curiosity and cause mistakes to happen. Just like if I don't allow soda in my house, I bet Landon would run to his friend's house and guzzle that shit down like there was no tomorrow.

    Rock on mama. And I can't wait for deer jerky! :)

    Reply
    1. Lilmissrysmama Post author

      You're so right…if guns are treated as crazy forbidden objects, it will just spike curiosity. There are things that parents can teach there kids about gun safety whether or not there is a gun in the house. And I also think that parents that don't have guns should find a resource for their kids if they are curious…something along the lines of "we don't own guns, and we never will, but I know you might have questions about them…". That would help to squelch the potentially dangerous curiosity.

      Reply
  2. Krista

    Oh friend. I was raised in a house with guns. I knew how to avoid them, how to treat them, I think I even took a hunter's safety class. But, my kid isn't raised in that kind of house.Craig doesn't hunt, and even though I remember my dad shooting groundhogs off of our back porch, I don't think I ever shot a gun, so we just don't have them. So, when my kid goes to my parent's house or my grandparents house, I do get uneasy about the guns. Not because I think they're not careful but because my kids haven't been taught what yours has (and what I was) about guns. It's not that I don't let them go there, but every time I do, I ask them to double check that the guns aren't loaded and that they are safe. It probably annoys them, but it's my kid(s) so I ask the question anyway.

    Reply
    1. Lilmissrysmama Post author

      I think you've got every right to be uneasy about it, and to be honest, I'm even uneasy about it! Just because we're teaching Rylee (and our next little one) these things, doesn't mean that if she goes to a friend's house that has guns in it, they teach their kid the same things and/or take the same precautions we do…and that scares the you-know-what out of me.

      Reply
  3. Ryan

    I lived my entire life with guns around. I grew up hunting with my old man from well before I could legally shoot/own a gun. When we went hunting I didn’t carry a gun, I was the dog. I went through training to learn how to officially use a gun and understand the laws of hunting when I was 16. Shortly thereafter I quit hunting. Call it my rebellion against my dad. About four years ago I decided to go back and take the courses again so I could have the opportunity to spend some quality time with my dad. I LOVE to shoot, I like hunting. I do it more for my pops than myself. I own guns, my guns are locked up and never, ever loaded in the house. My girls know I have them and they know they are never to touch them, even when I’m there. When they get older, if they want to learn, and their mother allows it, I will teach them. I was always taught to respect guns, not fear them, but a healthy fear is good. It kept me from playing with them when I knew I shouldn’t. The majority of guns that kill people are not hunting guns and are not bought legally. Strict guns Laws in Canada are why we have much less accidental and purposeful gun related murders than in the States. I’m not trying to preach against US gun laws, but they could definitely do a better job allowing who is able to purchase them. Good job shedding light on quality gun ownership, too many times the only thing people here is how gun owners are irresponsible. We don’t all belong in the same boat anymore than responsible drivers belong in the same boat as irresponsible ones. I have wrote way too much. Sorry for hijacking your blog with my own. I’m new at this shit. Haha

    Reply
    1. Lilmissrysmama Post author

      Hahaha, no apologies necessary…this is a heavy topic! I agree that some fear is absolutely healthy! You better believe that right as we're teaching Rylee about the safety of guns, she knows that bad things can happen when they are used improperly. And I love, LOVE your analogy about cars, because on my drive home last night after hitting publish, the very same thing went through my head! When it comes to guns (and driving) I'm probably a little extra cautious because I know how flippant others can be. When I see someone using a gun carelessly, I cringe. I'll be the first to admit I'm not as familiar with the US gun laws as I could be and I also know they vary state by state, but I definitely think there are some MAJOR areas of improvement when it comes to who has them, how they're sold, how they're stored, etc. Thanks for your comment!!

      Reply
  4. Jodi

    I too grew up in houses with lots of guns and I learned to shoot young. BB, .22, and an old 410 knocked me over a time or two until I really understood how to fire it. We as kids were required to take the gun safety class. Never fired a hand gun though… And no guns in our life now. I agree with Ryan tho… People FReAKeD about gun control modifications in Canada a number of years ago… My step dad included! But it was for the good… US could take a few pointers and still keep pro-gunners happy…

    Reply
    1. Lilmissrysmama Post author

      Agreed! We've got some areas for improvement (in way more than just gun laws if you ask me. HA!) and I think there's a solid middle ground in there where the majority of everyone could be happy about it.

      Reply
  5. Jason

    I loved this post. I didn’t grow up in a house with firearms but I was in the Boy Scouts and learned a lot about gun safety. I will own a firearm someday for home defense but that is the only reason. I am not a hunter but I am someone that believes those that are capable of owning a firearm should have that right.

    I am also and Oregonian and we still hear about Kip Kinkel and what happened. I do believe the standards for deciding who should and shouldn’t own a firearm in Oregon should be stricter.

    Great post.

    Reply
    1. Lilmissrysmama Post author

      Thanks! We own a home defense hand gun too. My husband has his concealed carry permit and I've contemplated getting mine. Not because I'm going to start carrying a gun around to the grocery store or anything, but a little extra training never hurt, right!?

      Oh man, I remember when the Thurston shooting happened…it was practically in my backyard and you're right, it's still brought up. I think we've still got a ways to go on deciding who should & shouldn't own a firearm. I've gone through the background check process…it should be more stringent.

      Reply
  6. Alicia

    As a mom blogger I totally agree with you. I love guns. My father taught me how to shoot out in the country. I also have an 11yo boy who I know I have made aware that the guns he plays with on his video games are very different than the real deal. I have my permit to buy my own and have been shooting a friends at the range. Once I am comfortable with a choice for myself and my home I will pull the trigger on the purchase. (you like that hehehe) I also want to take the concealed carry class.

    Do you watch TopShot? LOVE THAT SHOW!!!

    Reply
    1. Lilmissrysmama Post author

      I've heard about TopShot, but haven't ever seen it (we don't have cable). Thanks for your comment, it's nice to know I'm not completely alone out there in blogland when it comes to being {GASP!} pro gun. :)

      Reply
  7. Sydney

    I TOTALLY agree… It's the people that should be more highly regulated and educated. I even watched a myth busters in which a gun wouldn't go off with heavy shaking in a car, someone has to pull or bump that trigger. You know what, I have guns, and enjoy shooting them, but I'm also very uneasy about who around me may have them. I think as a parent you have the right to question and be guarded, however not everyone gun owner is crazy!

    Reply
    1. Lilmissrysmama Post author

      I am the same way…I am extra cautious around others w/ guns because they don't necessarily take the same precautions I do. And, because some people are just plain careless and stupid! But, it's exactly what you said…not every gun owner is crazy! It's the blanket generalizations that really make me mad!

      Reply
  8. Laura McMillan

    The shooter's parents were not held responsible in this case (I have included the link below). The 13 year old boy (who passed his hunter safety course) got home from a duck hunting trip with his father. The victim went over to the neighbor's house and the 13 year old neighbor boy picked up a loaded shotgun, pointed it at the victim's head and pulled the trigger. This is NOT an anti-gun issue in any way, just a story about a very beloved family in our community and how their world will never be the same. Here is the link, my hope is everyone will simply take a moment to read this. Thank you so very much for your time. http://www.indiegogo.com/austinstokes?a=402519

    Reply
  9. Ned

    People must have rights to have a tool to protect themselves. Not only for hunting reasons. Cause bad people still has guns even if they are prohibited, just the good people don't. So there is no point to make good ones unsafe. Of course, people should go through some psychological test when getting the licence for firearms, but then anyone should be able to have one, if capable.

    Reply
  10. Sobek

    Did you change your mind after the Orlando events? Anything can happen to anyone. And mental diseases can develop after you buy a gun. Unless US becomes gun-free such events will occur again and again. People need to realise that asap.

    Reply
  11. Patrick Horne

    Personally, I agree that gun should be monitored and administered by the government. Honestly, gun is lethal weapon and if can be easily accessed, many people will underestimate the affects it might bring. Imagine a man can use gun in civil conflict with his neighbors or in taking revenge of his ex-girl friend. This world will become much more chaos than now.

    Reply
  12. See more

    You're always entitled to some amount of self defense inside your own home, so you will likely at least have a lower sentence if you don't go free entirely . Shooting someone in your back yard however is just plain murder.

    I think the american pride and self-image has a lot to do with it.

    Reply

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